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Miniar Wrote:If there are no limitations on materials available and viable, and no limitations of space nor purpose for the house, then the first thing that comes to mind is probably gonna be what we build. But if we have limitations of materials, space and purpose, then more creativity is required to design a house that meets all the limitations.

Exactly - limitations don't stifle creativity, they encourage it.

aeryael Wrote:It's not like everyone's saying "oh, please be creative, do different things, change something, create something!". No. They just want you to do your job and live your normal life.

As an adult I don't really care that no-one says "Oh, please be creative, go create something!" - why in the world would I? If you want to be creative go and be creative. No-one is hampering you in any way and if you actually want to be creative you obviously don't need to be told to do it.

If you have a job that doesn't require creativity, that still has nothing whatsoever to do with whether or not you can be creative. At your job, unless you are self employed, you are paid by someone to perform tasks. In your free time you can do whatever you like. So long as "whatever you like" doesn't get in anyone's way, honestly, the people who want you to do your job don't really give a shit what you do in the weekends and evenings.
Archer Wrote:If you have a job that doesn't require creativity, that still has nothing whatsoever to do with whether or not you can be creative. At your job, unless you are self employed, you are paid by someone to perform tasks. In your free time you can do whatever you like. So long as "whatever you like" doesn't get in anyone's way, honestly, the people who want you to do your job don't really give a shit what you do in the weekends and evenings.

Or, you can just have lots of fun when the manager isn't looking. Like scaring people with masks, decorating/making displays, or handing your fellow employee a picture of a television chopping flowers with an axe (and then scamper off and laugh hysterically, of course). Not that I've done those things....*cough cough*

Oh believe me, there are TONS of ways to be creative at work <!-- sBig Grin --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_e_biggrin.gif" alt=":D" title="Very Happy" /><!-- sBig Grin -->
Uhm, I think I didn't express myself well. I meant, when you're a child, you're still discovering the world. You don't have too many responsabilities and you are free to explore and find your own explanations for things. Your mind isn't full of preconceived thoughts, everything is new and fantastic and mind-stimulating. When you're an adult, there are more things expected from you. You can't daydream all the time and you're supposed to follow some kind of routine, not be around fantasying and creating worlds in your mind.
So I meant, when I was a child, I could live "inside my world" and daydream and imagine things as I pleased, and it satisfied me. Today, that source of creativity is kinda behind and less shiny, and I kinda miss that fulfillment of imagination. There's just something missing today, when most things became banal.
aeryael Wrote:Uhm, I think I didn't express myself well. I meant, when you're a child, you're still discovering the world. You don't have too many responsabilities and you are free to explore and find your own explanations for things.

At the same time though, that can put a limit on creativity. When I was a kid my two favourite games were playing Doctor Who (what I guess would now be called free-form LARPing, heh) and climing up a tree to just sit on my own and imagine different worlds and make stories for myself.

When I got older, I certainly couldn't spend every day of two-month-long summer holidays up a tree daydreaming - but I did learn about dramatic theory, and I read Dickens and Tennyson and Frost and Pratchett and Vaughn, and I studied movies and TV shows and learned to appreciate them on a level completely separate from simply "liking the story" or identifying with a character. I often say my "awakening" has been 20+ years in the making - but I kid you not when I say I've spent just as long trying to understand Star Wars (and seeing fifteen minutes of Revenge of the Sith last week actually opened my eyes to another theme in it I'd never noticed before).

Rules and responsibilities only stifle creativity if you let them. Otherwise they can be fuel for growth. On a really basic level - would Tennyson's In Memoriam be such an amazing poem if it didn't stick to a very rigid structure? Not a chance. On a basic level of another kind - would Buffy (when she was at high school) have been such a great character if she wasn't trying to balance saving the world from vampires with studying for class tests?

Some of the greatest literature in the world comes from that very basic conflict between "what I want" and "what I know my responsibilities are". Again to use two differing examples, in Les Miserables Jean valjean just wants to run like hell from the cops . . . but he doesn't, he turns himself in, frees an innocent man, and forfeits the life of luxury he had. In Babylon 5, Sheridan wanted to stay with the woman he loved . . . but he didn't, he left her to fight shadows.

The battle between desire and responsibility is, I could argue, at the heart of all drama. So how can creativity really be meaningful coming from someone who doesn't have to battle between desire and responsibility themselves? As a kid, daydreaming without a care in the world, could you or anyone else really grasp that conflict and "create" about it? I don't think so.

The sad irony, of course, is that so many people - myself included - grow up and end up going too far one way or the other. Meet that conflict between what you want and what your responsibility is, and just pick a path and follow it. But that conflict doesn't stifle creativity. That conflict is what allows creativity in the first place.

Quote:Your mind isn't full of preconceived thoughts, everything is new and fantastic and mind-stimulating. When you're an adult, there are more things expected from you. You can't daydream all the time and you're supposed to follow some kind of routine, not be around fantasying and creating worlds in your mind.

I think a mistake that's very easy to make is that daydreaming is creativity. I don't think it is. People who are genuinely talented creatively and are genuinely willing and able to put the hard work in can and do spend all day and make millions exercising that creativity. But if daydreaming is all you aspire to - your commute, the 5 minutes you lie in bed before you sleep, a walk around the streets at lunchtime, letting your mind wander instead of staring at soap operas . . . the opportunity is there for anyone who wants to take it.

Quote:So I meant, when I was a child, I could live "inside my world" and daydream and imagine things as I pleased, and it satisfied me. Today, that source of creativity is kinda behind and less shiny, and I kinda miss that fulfillment of imagination. There's just something missing today, when most things became banal.

Perhaps you've grown up faster than your imagination has. It's not that adult life took the creativity out of you - it's that the escapism that was once fulfilling no longer is because you are now a more mature and multi-layered person than you used to be.

The fault is not in our stars, but in ourselves.
I have never felt energy deficient. I tend to feel like I have more than I need. Except when I am in walmart..but that is probably a whole different topic.

Anyway. I identify myself as Sidhe, but I define Sidhe in a way that may not Jive with some in regards tot his subject.
aeryael- I'm wondering if you aren't referring to that "childlike sense of wonder" that most of us had, then lost. Where the world seems exciting and mysterious, and the littlest things can bring you a great sense of joy.

If that's the case, then I'd like to say that with a bit of work, you can regain that if you have lost it. In my opinion, it's all about letting yourself be happy by little things. In this day and age, it seems that only some extreme external factors- like bonus paycheck or a new boyfriend/girlfriend- will "make" a person happy. I'm not really sure why that is, but it's something that I've observed in many people.

But like I said, you can change that, with a bit of work. You have to first take notice of these little things. And they can be anything. For example, one of mine is that first thing in the morning, I wake up, and see that my cat is curled up on my bed with me. Simple, right? I mean heck, she does that pretty much every morning; nothing new. But I allow it to fill me with happiness. I just stop, really think about what has happened (that my cat stayed with me through the night, even through all the tossing and turning and talking in my sleep that I know took place), take a moment to appreciate it....and suddenly, it feels like a balloon of happiness is swelling up inside me. A nice way to wake up every morning, no?
And on the odd chance that my cat isn't there when I wake up? I don't count it as a loss. I just move on and find the next little thing to be happy about.

Another example of what you can do is, as often as you can, really think about how things work. Maybe your driving to school/work one morning, and you see a few trees. Instead of in your mind just registering them as "oh, trees, what else is new?" really think about the process of how those trees came to be. It was once just a little seed that could fit in your hand, and now look at it.

Doing this, I've found, keeps your childlike sense of wonder intact. As well as asking questions about everything- even inside your head. That's one of the reasons I love the computer so much: 9 times out of 10, it can satisfy this curiosity. Also, I've noticed that when you think and feel this way, creativity seems to follow. No, not all the time, but more often than thinking of everything as mundane and boring.

Now, a general disclaimer- this is just what I've found, which may not work for everyone. Also, I'm not necessarily directing it at anyone, or saying that you/they don't already do this.*shrugs*

Hope it helps.
Eternity, yes, maybe it has to do with the childlike sense of wonder. I do that! What you said, about the little things. When we have the capacity to see the wonder around us, we feel connected to life and full of it. It's really great.

I think this thread got a bit carried away by something I mentioned and wasn't exactly my point, this child thing. I just tried to make a comparison, but it's not the most important part of what I was trying to say.
Eternity Wrote:aeryael- I'm wondering if you aren't referring to that "childlike sense of wonder" that most of us had, then lost. Where the world seems exciting and mysterious, and the littlest things can bring you a great sense of joy.

If that's the case, then I'd like to say that with a bit of work, you can regain that if you have lost it. In my opinion, it's all about letting yourself be happy by little things. In this day and age, it seems that only some extreme external factors- like bonus paycheck or a new boyfriend/girlfriend- will "make" a person happy. I'm not really sure why that is, but it's something that I've observed in many people.

I'm one of those people with a sense of childlike wonder still intact, somewhat.

I realized, personally, that for a little bit, I'd get so focused on one thing only - be it making money, going to a party, etc. I'd be focused on money because I'm in debt and it seemed money would solve everything and lead me to a position where I was not in debt.

And money buys you pretty things, yes, but also pretty experiences. Plane tickets to places, skydiving, bungee jumping, tattoos.... all require the green stuff.

Partying was a way to do something when not everything else was available. There'd always be a drink in hand, something fun to do...

But it got to the point where I could only focus on a few things and I ignored everything else. My sense of wonder disappeared for a time because if what I wanted to happen did not happen, then that was it. Anything else didn't even matter. The only things that were interesting were the things I wanted to be interesting.

And I regained it. I think little things aren't just cool, but flat out awesome: collecting snail shells, feathers, seeing an animal I rarely see in the wild, seeing wild animals in the city, no less! I saw a coyote the other day near my park and I thought that was the awesomest thing ever.

Sadly, not everyone shares my viewpoint. It's hard to get people into that mindset of "anything new is cool!" but when you do, you can make for some fun with it.

Edit: after debating a little about this with some people I know, a couple of my friends have mentioned the reason most adults don't build up this sense of wonder is because having a high expectation towards something can only screw you over if it isn't as awesome as you thought it'd be.

Which is true, but now I'm asking them why then they aren't so happy over tiny things that have already happened, and no one can give me a straight answer. XD
aeryael Wrote:I putted the "excess" matter from the other thread together with what I've been learning about vampirism, and came to the thought of that fae can maybe have a natural strong necessity of feeding from a specific kind of energy.
For what I know, fae are strongly connected to creativity and pleasure, as in, we're "fueled" by that. That's a constant need. When I'm not exercizing my creativity, or talking to creative people, learning new things, discovering new ideas, seeing good art, or even daydreaming, or "feeding" myself with "creative energy" in anyway, I feel pretty down and energyless. It's compared to a strong hunger, which I think I could call craving.
This energy I can also find in any kind of beautiful or inspiring things, or in Nature. Well, I think we could say it's basicly Inspiration of any sort.

When not "fed", I feel lifeless, depressed, uneasy, blocked, physically weak, sleepy, and there it goes.

I've noticed this pattern in me and the other fae chicks I know. I'd like to know if there's other Fae who does, or doesn't, identify with that, or can add anything on that.

Anyway that all makes me think of the Leanan Sidhe, who would be faeries that take human lovers that would have a highly inspired, but short life. And the whole idea of a Muse.

(sorry, as always, if I sound confuse. It seems that my brain gets more damaged by the second.)




I completely agree with this, Im a fae succubus. I feed off energy, i beilieve. ^^
Kapaki Wrote:I completely agree with this, Im a fae succubus. I feed off energy, i beilieve. ^^

I don't know if I consciously feed off of ambient energy or not. What does it feel like when you do it?
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